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Heritage Skills Placement - Kirkby Stephen East - Upholstery

logo for host companyThis 3 month bursary placement has been made possible thanks to a combination of funding from a local Trust, private individuals and the RDPE.

The placement provided training for one student to learn how to upholster carriage seats for a Gresley tourist third open teak railway carriage that was being restored by Stainmore Railway Company at Kirkby Stephen East Railway Station. The training was provided by Stephen Ball Upholstery, along with evening classes at Ullswater Community College.

Read Glynis' blog from her time in training here

"I've enjoyed my placement even more than I imagined. I've learned so much, through doing real jobs, and I've surprised myself by how quickly I've picked things up. It doesn't feel like work and the team here are very welcoming and supportive. Steve is an excellent teacher
- both here in the workshop and at the evening classes, where I'm working on a pair of dining chairs. I'm enjoying all aspects of the work, from stripping furniture down (an excellent way of learning how it's been put together), repairing or adding upholstery as required and recovering. Steve's also currently making some bespoke sofas for a customer, so I'm seeing them built from scratch, using hardwood he's selected specially for the job. No doubt at all about what I want to do from now on!

The seamstress is sharing her skills with me - a vital part of an upholsterer's skill set and which I need for the train seats. I'm looking forward as much as all of you to seeing them in place in the Gresley TTO 60505. Family and friends are also looking forward to sitting on them when the train goes on the track. No pressure!"

Read more about the RDPE here

for more information go to the EU Commission's rural development website

This project has been part financed by the European Agricultural Fund for European Development 2007-2013: Europe investing in rural areas.

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Cumbria

Arnhem Block, Carlisle Castle - NECT Cumbria HQ

NECT has worked in Cumbria for many years, but since 2009 has had a base at Carlisle Castle, first in Arroyo Block and now Arnhem, shown above. NECT continues to work across its whole range of disciplines, from conservation planning, education, skills and built heritage, to historical analysis, architectural advice and the project management of capital works. See our projects page for examples of our work in Cumbria.

Staff from our Newcastle headquarters continue to work in Cumbria as and when necessary, but our team leader for Cumbria is:

Projects Team Leader (Cumbria)
Lisa Rothwell-Young
Mobile: 07775028681
Email: lisa.rothwell-young@nect.org.uk

Lisa has an overview of NECT's work across Cumbria and is the first point of contact for potential projects/organisations wanting to work with us, or those needing advice and assistance. She is also responsible for delivery of the Heritage Skills Initiative (HSI) in Cumbria.


Cumbria Heritage Skills Initiative

The RDPE and DEFRA Logos

Cumbria latest...

Heritage Skills in Action


Cumbria Heritage Skills Festival 2012

Cumbria Heritage Skills Festival 2012

The festival took place on Saturday 8th and Sunday 9th September at Heron Corn Mill, Beetham and over the two days more than 800 people explored what was on offer, the majority visiting the mill for the first time.

If you would like more information on how you can take part in this year’s festival, please contact Kate McAleer on 07557 399 239 or email kate.mcaleer@nect.org.uk


Cumbria Projects

Frizington

Frizington Main Street and Council Chambers

In the summer of 2011, the Design Council CABE invited applications from design organisations across England to bid for small grants to help them explore the value of design in the environment. There were over 130 applications, including one by North of England Civic Trust (NECT) for Frizington. It was one of only 13 applications that were successful, and it was the only one in Cumbria. NECT is now working with the community to look at Frizington as a settlement within the wider landscape and to consider what is distinctive about it as a place – what is special, that people would want to safeguard and celebrate? For example, we will be looking in more detail at Main Street and thinking about how the character of Frizington is represented there – is Main Street fine as it is, or could it be improved? Could design make Main Street better? Lighting? Colour? Traffic management?

Finally, we shall be looking at the former Council Chambers building and the adjacent yard, to ask how this once important civic building could be revived so that it not only looks the part, but plays its part for the good of the community.


Copeland Borough Conservation and Design Advice

Whitehaven c. 1738 (copyright Copeland Borough Council)

Since 2009, NECT has been retained to provide conservation and design advice for Copeland Borough Council. Using up to four of its highly experienced members of staff, NECT has helped Copeland develop its in-house understanding and skills on historic environment management in relation to planning, investment and development management.

We are currently producing the Stage 2 Townscape Heritage Initiative bid for Whitehaven Town Centre Conservation Area.

Cleator Moor

Carlisle Diocese Church Buildings Audit

Burne-Jones stained glass window, Jesus Church, Troutbeck

After receiving an English Heritage grant in 2006, the Carlisle Diocese approached NECT and asked it to audit all 348 of the Diocese's church buildings. The aims of this project were two-fold. Firstly, to review the current listing status of each building, and secondly to provide a comprehensive overview of each individual church building’s potential for wider community use. This overview is now being used to assist in strategic planning for the diocese.

St John the Baptist, Croglin

Brampton Conservation Area Action Plan

NECT was commissioned to take the existing character appraisal and management plan for the conservation area and develop an action plan to bring about investment, enhancement and community engagement. A great deal of stakeholder involvement has generated a valuable series of objectives and projects which, over time, will help to protect the conservation area into the future.


Settle-Carlisle Railway - Design Guides

Conservation guide for Settle-Carlisle Railway

One of the last great mainline railways to be built in Britain, the lines, buildings and structures of the Settle-Carlisle Railway form an admirably intact and healthy historic environment. Significance depends in part on period authenticity, so NECT was commissioned by the Settle-Carlisle Conservation Area Partnership (English Heritage, community interests and the four relevant local authorities including Carlisle City Council) to prepare a set of guidelines to promote investment. They were based on a thorough understanding of the architectural features to be conserved, and explored how their significance should justify investment in repair and maintenance to ensure their contribution to the railway’s outstanding character and heritage appeal. The guides included practical solutions on materials and methods. Alongside this, NECT took the opportunity to prepare a fun children’s activity sheet on the railway, which was available locally.


Eskdale Mill - Options Appraisal

Eskdale Mill

Located near the head of one of the most picturesque and dramatic valleys of the Lake District, Eskdale Mill dates from 1578. It is one of the very few remaining two wheel water corn mills, and houses an exhibition of life in Cumbria, its industry and its people as well as explaining the whole milling process and the workings of the unique wooden machinery. Milling has been a feature of Esk Valley life since the 12th century. The first documented evidence of Eskdale Mill dates from 1578. The mill continued to grind cereals until the early 1920s, when a dynamo was installed, and the upper wheel of the mill continued to make electricity until 1955 when mains power came to the valley.

Cumbria County Council purchased the property in 1972 and a programme of restoration work was carried out, which brought much of the mill back into working order. However, in early 2003 it was decided that the Council could no longer continue to be responsible for the Mill and decided to sell off the building.

Eskale Mill and Heritage Trust (EMHT) commissioned NECT to undertake an options appraisal in advance of the outcome of the County Council’s decision on whether EMHT could acquire the mill. NECT’s experience in providing independent specialist advice, and direct experience from delivering its own capital projects, was considered appropriate to the needs of Eskdale Mill and the aspirations of EMHT. In June 2005, ownership passed to EMHT, who will preserve the historic fabric of the Mill for future generations and continue to run the Mill as a visitor attraction.